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The Ninth Passenger DVD Review

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Horror movies don’t get much worse than “The Ninth Passenger.”

After seven people (Nicole, Jess, Marty, Lance, Malcolm, Tina, Christy) and a mysterious spy posing as a maintenance man (Brady) hop on board Marty’s father’s yacht to party it up, Marty decides to take the boat out into the water. As you can probably guess, this turns out to be a big mistake. Not only does the yacht stop functioning, but in their search for help, members of the group stumble across an abandoned facility that just so happens to house some crazed creatures that may have been created by Marty’s CEO father’s corporation. Will anyone be able to survive encounters with these monsters?

“The Ninth Passenger” is the type of indie horror film that you just can’t help but shake your head at. From the first 3 minutes, it becomes abundantly clear that viewers are in for a rough 76 minute ride (although it feels longer). The characters are barely developed, virtually nothing happens in the first 45 minutes, the violence is often offscreen for some unknown reason, the demogorgon wannabe creatures are goofy and not remotely scary looking, the dialogue is laughable (I’m still not convinced this movie had a full script), director Corey Large is unable to create anything resembling tension or terror, and the movie is filled with an endless amount of long, drug out shots of walking, sailing, driving, and characters wandering around with flashlights.

The film’s greatest sin, however, is the cast. Jessie Metcalfe and Veronica Dunne lead a cast of actors who are at their worst here. Metcalfe is easily the best part of the cast but he looks uninterested in everything he’s doing (no one can blame him for that). The rest of the cast is largely painful to watch particularly Tom Maden as Lance (behold the worst inebriated acting!) and the emotionless David Hennessey as Marty.

Video/Audio:

Presentation: 2.35:1. How does it look? Surprisingly, the disc boasts a decent standard definition transfer.

Audio Track: Dolby Digital 5.1. How does it sound? It does the job.

The only extras are Lionsgate trailers.

Overall Thoughts: “The Ninth Passenger” fails miserably as a horror film. Had this been campy, it might have been more entertaining, but it plays it straight. Skip it.

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July 31, 2018 - Posted by | DVD review | ,

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